Then & Now Downtown Traverse City Webpage

Original Park Place Hotel, a wooden structure, ca. 1890-1920.

Original Park Place Hotel, a wooden structure, ca. 1890-1920.

If you have not been to downtown Traverse City lately, you likely have not seen one of our most ambitious projects, the Then & Now Downtown Traverse City local history “points of interest” walk! 10 plaques are scattered in the downtown area, each showing a picture of the area as it was way-back when. Follow this link to learn more about this project, our partners, and to see a map of each location:

https://tcpublicart.org/then-and-now

November 2019 Newsletter now available

We hope you will enjoy our latest newsletter! In this issue, read a summary of our impact on regional history in the past year, learn more about a generous donation made by a local entrepreneur, get an update on the work happening at the site of Hitchcock/Goodale Farmhouse foundation along with our committee reports, and read a brief history of Hannah Lay & Co. Mercantile.

Follow the hyperlink below to download the newsletter:

2019 November

Support TAHS at “Shop Your Community Day 2019”

Support Traverse Area Historical Society on the 2nd Saturday of November just by shopping Downtown Traverse City! For every purchase you make at participating stores, 15% of the sale will be donated to the organization of your choice. It’s easy to support our amazing work at TAHS AND get a jump on your holiday shopping! Event runs from 10 am to 6 pm.

Proceeds earned from this event support our mission, to preserve, protect, and present the historical record of Traverse City and Grand Traverse County. We meet our mission by organizing free, public local history events and programs, supporting our summer interns in archival work, and more!

Invitation: Then & Now Ribbon Cutting

The Traverse City Arts Commission is thrilled to announce that the Then & Now project will be installed on October 21st. We invite you to join us for a ribbon cutting on Tuesday, October 22nd at 3:30 pm. Please meet at the DDA Office at 303 E. State St., Ste. C.

The Then & Now project is a series of plaques featuring photos from “then” next to the landscape of “now.” A collaboration between the Traverse Area Historical Society and the Traverse Area District Library helped make the project possible. Then & Now was funded through the Public Art Trust Fund and the Downtown Traverse City Association.

Projects like this, showcasing our area history, is what TAHS is all about. Thank you to our members, who support fantastic works like this to keep our history alive and well.

A special thanks to TAHS director Fred Anderson who saw the project through from concept to completion, and directors Peg Siciliano and Sharon Jennings for their ongoing assistance.

TAHS Annual Meeting

The annual meeting of The Traverse Area Historical Society will be held Saturday, October 19th at 1:00 pm in the McGuire room at the Traverse Area District Library, 610 Woodmere Avene, Traverse City. TAHS members are encouraged to attend and vote in the annual board of directors election.

September 2019 TAHS Program — The Lost Doughboys of Grand Traverse County

 

Sunday, September 8th at 2 pm in the McGuire room of the Traverse Area District Library, Main Branch.

 

Who were our Grand Traverse Doughboys who went Over There and never came home? Come hear the stories of some of the nearly ninety men from our region who fought and died in the Great War and whose names are on the World War I marker in our beautiful Veterans Park. Local historian and Interlochen Arts Academy instructor Brian McCall will present this program.

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April 2019 TAHS Program — How Schools Changed: Traverse City Public: a Case Study by Richard Fidler

Saturday, April 20th at 1pm, in the McGuire room Traverse Area District Library, Main Branch

Local historian Richard Fidler will present on the history of education in Traverse City from 1885 to the present day: instruction, curriculum, tests, the mission of schooling, Title IX, growth of technology, and above all, the influence of the federal and state governments on school practice.

Examining student handbooks, yearbooks, school board records, eighth grade tests from 1919, state education websites, Grand Traverse Normal School records, oral histories, interviews, newspaper articles, and photographs from the Local History collection of the Traverse Area District Library, Richard Fidler will show us what schools used to be—as well as how they became what they are today. Told as a narrative focused on the Traverse City Area Public Schools, this history of education will interest all who care about children, teachers, and schools.

We hope to see you there!

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